Preventable Moving Mistakes

Moving within the same building or city isn’t as easy as everyone makes it sound, it still takes time and preparation. If you’re moving out of the state or even country, it will take much more discipline and focus. To make the whole process a little better for everyone, read about what not to do when you move.

Not Packing a Bag with Your Essentials

No matter how close you’re moving, you need to have an essentials bag, as anything could happen and you may end up in between apartments for longer than you planned. The easiest way to decide what to pack is to think of your essentials bag like a carry-on for an airplane; make sure it has everything you need, but keep it tight. At the very least, you need to have enough clothes for three days, your prescription bottle, toiletries, cash for food, gas, and possibly a laundromat, and your phone charger. Packing just enough of your pills for the days on the road is tempting, but it would be better to have your entire pill bottle on you, should you spend more days as a nomad than planned or you require a prescription refill. It may be tempting to share an essentials bag with someone, but everyone should really have their own essentials bag with their belongings they are responsible for.

Neglecting Valuables and Fragile Items

It is a common misconception to think your valuables will be okay packed with everything else in the moving van or semi-truck. This a mistake, as moving companies waive responsibility for any property damaged while on the road. The correct way to move your valuables is to have them safely packed in your vehicle, hidden if possible. That way, should anything break or get stolen, you are the only one responsible. If you have renter’s insurance, depending on your coverage, your valuables will be protected as long as you notify your insurance provider where you are moving to and when, as well as what route. Should anything happen, they know what you were doing with your valuables so far away from your insured address. Additionally, when your insurance provider knows what day you’re moving into your new apartment, you can have your renter’s insurance policy transferred to your new address, keeping your insured the whole way through you move. Be sure all your fragile items have been packed properly with the box clearly labeled so movers know to be extra careful with it.

Choosing the Wrong Moving Company

Movers will be handling everything you own, it’s critical you choose the right people! It will be awfully inviting to choose the first company you see and be done with it, but that may be the worst mistake you make. It is imperative you read over the reviews of previous customers to educate yourself with genuine feedback from real people about the company. Whatever you do, do not rush yourself when searching for the right moving company, if you’re moving long distance, you will be clocking many hours and miles with these people.

Not Hiring a Moving Company

If you’re able-bodied and have friends or family to help you, you’re probably okay moving yourself within the same building or city. If you’re moving across the state, country, or even the globe, sorry, but you will need the assistance of professionals. Everyone wants to keep their moving costs as low as they can, but the move will go over better when people who do this for a living are helping. You will inevitably spend more money, but your back and gas tank will be pleased when you don’t have to lift everything and drive back and forth by yourself.

Not Getting Insured

Insurance is one thing you do not want to sleep on. As soon as you know your moving dates, contact your insurance provider and let them know the dates you’re moving and your new address. Not only will you be protected during the drive there, as stated before, but you’ll also be insured the moment you walk into your new spot. Whatever moving company you use, they most likely have insurance, but their policy and what it protects will have to be a topic you talk about prior to hiring their help. Even if they have an impressive insurance policy, you will still need your own insurance policy to protect your neck the best you can!

Not Rereading the Inventory

It’s easy to forget belongings and leave items behind when you move. It is crucial to make sure everything gets moved out of your apartment before you lock the door and move. Almost more important, you will have to ensure you performed all the necessary tasks and cleanings of your previous apartment as stated in the lease agreement. You do not want to have to pay your former landlord to clean something you could have done yourself. Prior to loading into the new apartment, give it a once over and take a picture of any holes, dents, and scrapes. You don’t want to be responsible for damage you didn’t’ do. After all your boxes have been moved into the new apartment, look through all your boxes and make sure none of the movers broke anything while taking it off the truck and into the apartment.

Not Removing Unneeded Items

If you haven’t been using it, don’t move it. Packing for the move is the best time to rid yourself of everything you haven’t used, worn, or is broken. Anything you can sell, whether it be clothing, electronics, whatever, should be sold to help cover any moving expenses. Anything broken should be thrown away immediately and anything unsold can be donated. The trick is to bring the least amount of stuff along to make it as easy as possible. The less you bring into your new apartment, the longer it will take for a mess to form.

Procrastinating on Packing

The worst thing you can do is try to push packing off until the last minute. Trying to pack too late will lead to increased anxiety and only cause you to pack poorly. You’re more likely to be unorganized and increase the chance of forgetting items. If you take anything away from this article, give yourself twice the amount of time to handle everything related to the move. Giving yourself more than enough time to get your ducks in a row will make the move better for everyone involved.

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